365 Days of Art: October 30 – Hide/Seek Opens

October 30, 2014

Ellen DeGeneres in Kauai, Hawaii by Annie Leibowitz

Ellen DeGeneres in Kauai, Hawaii by Annie Leibowitz

October 30, 2010

Hide/Seek, the first major museum exhibition to explore themes of sexual identity in portraiture, opens at the National Portrait Gallery. More than 100 works of varying media by artists including Georgia O’Keeffe, Jasper Johns, Annie Liebowitz, and Andy Warhol, are on display. The show not only explores the contributions of LGBTQ artists, but traces the role that sexual identity has played in the development of American art: for example, making the connection between the closeting of gay sexual identity and the development of the “hidden” language of abstraction.

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365 Days of Art: October 29 – Tortured Witness Testifies Against Artemesia, George Luks Dies After Bar Fight, Art Forger Goes on Trial

October 30, 2014

Artemisia Gentileschi, Judith Slaying Holofernes, 1611-1612

Artemisia Gentileschi, Judith Slaying Holofernes, 1611-1612

October 29, 1612

The manuscript from the trial of Artemisia Gentileschi’s rapist shows that Artemisia’s studio assistant gives testimony against the victim, his boss…while being tortured.

Nicolo Bedino, who ground and mixed colors for Artemisia, is stripped naked and hung from a rope while testifying that he had delivered letters from her to several men. This evidence is used to imply that she was a loose woman, and that it isn’t a case of rape at all.

George Luks, "The Wrestlers", 1905

George Luks, “The Wrestlers”, 1905

October 29, 1933

George Luks dies after a bar fight in NYC.

Han van Meegeren in the witness box at his trial. One of his forgeries is behind him.

Han van Meegeren in the witness box at his trial. One of his forgeries is behind him.

October 29, 1947

The trial of art forger Han van Meegeren begins in Amsterdam. He becomes one of the world’s best art forgers ever, deciding that he has something to prove after art teachers and critics call his work unoriginal and uninspired. One of his forged Vermeers is hailed as one of the finest “Vermeers” ever.

His forgery is discovered after World War II when when a forged piece (believed to be authentic) is discovered in Reichsmarschall Hermann Goring’s private art collection. Dutch authorities charge Han with giving away Dutch cultural property and arrest him as a Nazi conspirator. Han decides to admit to the forgery, a lesser crime, rather than be sentenced to death for treason.

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365 Days of Art: October 28 – Manet Marries Childhood Piano Teacher (and Baby Mama)

October 28, 2014

Edouard Manet, The Reading, 1865 - 1873. Léon Koëlla, Madame Manet's (and likely Edouard's) son, reads to her.

Edouard Manet, The Reading, 1865 – 1873. Léon Koëlla, Madame Manet’s (and likely Edouard’s) son, reads to her.

October 28, 1863

Edouard Manet marries Suzanne Leenhoff, the childhood piano teacher his father hired to provide music lessons to Edouard and his brother. After a relationship of more than ten years, they finally marry after Manet’s father dies. At the time of the wedding, Leenhoff has an 11-year old son named Léon Koëlla, who is not referred to as her son, but as her younger brother. Manet, who sometimes paints the boy, is almost definitely his unacknowledged father.

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365 Days of Art: October 27 – Egon Schiele Completes Last Artworks, Lichtenstein is Born, Pinacoteca Vaticana Opens

October 27, 2014

Egon Schiele, Dying Edith Schiele, 1918

Egon Schiele, Dying Edith Schiele, 1918

October 27, 1918

Egon Schiele completes his final two artworks, drawings of his wife in bed with the Spanish flu. She dies the next morning, as did 20 million others in this worldwide epidemic. Schiele himself dies three days afterwards, also of the flu.

Roy Lichtenstein, Thinking of Him, 1963

Roy Lichtenstein, Thinking of Him, 1963

October 27, 1923

Roy Lichtenstein is born.

Pinacoteca Vaticana

Pinacoteca Vaticana

October 27, 1932

The Vatican’s collection of paintings receives a new building, called the Pinacoteca Vaticana. Until this point, the paintings are housed in the Borgia Apartment. The collection includes paintings by artists including: Giotto, Raphael, Leonardo, and Caravaggio.

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365 Days of Art: October 26 – Joan Brown Killed While Installing Sculpture

October 26, 2014

Joan Brown, Nude, Dog, Clouds, 1963

Joan Brown, Nude, Dog, Clouds, 1963

October 26, 1990

Joan Brown is killed while installing an obelisk she designed. This is probably the perfect way for an artist to die. I remember reading about this in our student newspaper at UC Berkeley, where she was a professor at the time.

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365 Days of Art: October 25 – Picasso is Born, Krasner and Pollock Marry, Breton Excommunicates Matta for Affair with Gorky’s Wife

October 25, 2014

Pablo Picasso, The Actor, 1904-1905

Pablo Picasso, The Actor, 1904-1905

October 25, 1881

Picasso is born. Two fun facts about Picasso: his father was a drawing professor, and while most people think he couldn’t draw because of his focus on abstraction and Cubism, Picasso himself was excellent at drawing.

Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock c. 1949

Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock c. 1949

October 25, 1945

Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock marry.

Matta and Breton c. 1939

Matta and Breton c. 1939

October 25, 1948

André Breton excommunicates Matta from the Surrealist movement, via a letter to the group, condemning him for “moral ignominy and intellectual disqualification.” Underlying this decision is Breton’s conviction that Matta had driven Arshile Gorky to suicide by sleeping with his wife, Mougouch.

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365 Days of Art: October 24 – Frida Writes a Letter About Diego’s Affair, Bacon’s Love Commits Suicide

October 24, 2014

Friday y Diego, circa 1931 in San Francisco

Friday y Diego, circa 1931 in San Francisco

October 24, 1934

Frida writes to her pal and confidante, Dr. Eloesser:

I have suffered so much in three months that it is going to be difficult for me to feel completely well soon but I have done everything I can to forget what happened between Diego and me [referring to his affair with her sister Cristina] and to live again as before”.

Francis Bacon, Triptych, May - June 1973, 1973

Francis Bacon, Triptych, May – June 1973, 1973

October 24, 1971

George Dyer, Francis Bacon’s longtime love, commits suicide, just before the opening of Bacon’s retrospective at Paris’ Grand Palais. His death, by a deliberate overdose of pills in their hotel room, inspires Bacon to paint Triptych, May–June 1973, a portrait of Dyer’s last moments.

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365 Days of Art: October 23 – Gauguin Moves in with Vincent; Art Exhibition Takes on Chicago Mayor’s Brutality

October 23, 2014

Paul Gauguin, The Painter of Sunflowers (Portrait of Vincent van Gogh), 1888

Paul Gauguin, The Painter of Sunflowers (Portrait of Vincent van Gogh), 1888

October 23, 1888

Paul Gauguin arrives in Arles to live with Vincent van Gogh in the Yellow House. This is something Vincent has wanted for some time, but his dreams of an art community dissipate as he and Gauguin repeatedly clash. By the end of the fall, Gauguin moves out and Vincent infamously cuts off his ear.

Barnett Newman, Lace Curtain for Mayor Daley, mixed media sculpture with barbed wire, 1968

Barnett Newman, Lace Curtain for Mayor Daley, mixed media sculpture with barbed wire, 1968

October 23, 1968

The Richard J. Daley Exhibition opens at Feigen Gallery in Chicago, in direct response to the brutality that protesters, regular folks, and even news anchors like Mike Wallace and Dan Rather experience at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago–with the encouragement of Mayor Daley.

A total of 47 artists take part in the show, with 21 of them making new work that directly comments on the summer of violence. Artists include Claes Oldenburg (a Chicago native), James Rosenquist, and Barnett Newman, who cancels an entire solo show in Chicago out of moral qualms about what is happening.

Newman’s piece above not only uses material like barbed wire to comment on the police state that Chicago becomes for the duration of the convention, but it takes a particularly insulting slam at Mayor Daley by drawing the inference of “lace curtain Irish”. Daley, a proud Irish-American in a city full of proud Irish-Americans, would have taken umbrage to the implication that he puts on airs or behaves like the Protestant gentry, like the titular Irish immigrants who hang lace curtains in their shacks.

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365 Days of Art: October 22 – Cezanne Dies

October 22, 2014

Paul Cezanne, The Pool, 1876

Paul Cezanne, The Pool, 1876

October 22, 1906

Paul Cezanne dies. He’s very important to 20th century art, and ushers in ideas about abstraction, especially reducing forms to their essential shapes, which other artists run with. He paints the same mountain over and over, dozens of times, to really investigate it. Watching Mt. Rainier now, with all of its different colors and moods, I can really appreciate that you can never nail it exactly. One of my favorite Cezanne tricks is that he never washes a brush without first daubing some of that color in another spot of his canvas. That’s why you’ll see patches of blue in his grounds and trees, and patches of ochre and brown in his skies. He believes that everything is inter-related, and this provides continuity for the eye.

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365 Days of Art: October 21 – Delacroix Writes to Brother About Patriotism, Guggenheim Museum Opens, Warhol Invites Self to Party at Leather Bar

October 21, 2014

Liberty Leading the People, by Eugene Delacroix, 1830

Liberty Leading the People, by Eugene Delacroix, 1830

October 21, 1830

Eugene Delacroix, who has been working on Liberty Leading the People, writes to his brother:

My bad mood is vanishing thanks to hard work. I’ve embarked on a modern subject — a barricade. And if I haven’t fought for my country at least I’ll paint for her.”

Guggenheim Museum, NYC

Guggenheim Museum, NYC

October 21, 1959

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum opens on Fifth Avenue in the stunning spiral building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. It’s one of my favorite buildings because it’s so weird. It’s the first American museum to be built from scratch, rather than converted from a private residence.

Fun fact: Ellsworth Kelly recalls a not-yet-famous Andy Warhol, dressed in a suit for the opening reception. Not only does Andy eavesdrop on a private conversation, but he hears others discuss plans to go to an after-party at a gay leather bar, then stuns everyone by inviting himself along.

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365 Days of Art: October 20 – Peggy Guggenheim Opens Art of This Century Gallery

October 20, 2014

Peggy Guggenheim at Art of This Century

Peggy Guggenheim at Art of This Century

October 20, 1942

Peggy Guggenheim opens the Art of This Century art gallery at 30 W. 57th Street in New York.

A press release calls gallery a “research laboratory for new ideas” that will “serve the future instead of recording the past”. Guggenheim specializes in the work of European modernists and Surrealists like Picasso, Mondrian, and Klee, as well as emerging American artists like Joseph Cornell. Later, she’ll become known for launching the careers of the Abstract Expressionists, particularly Jackson Pollock.

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365 Days of Art: October 19 – Henry Ossawa Tanner Wins French Art Award

October 19, 2014

Henry Ossawa Tanner, Daniel in the Lions' Den, 1907-1918 (recreation of the original, award-winning 1895 work, which was lost)

Henry Ossawa Tanner, Daniel in the Lions’ Den, 1907-1918 (recreation of the original, award-winning 1895 work, which was lost)

October 19, 1900

Henry Ossawa Tanner, a black painter who moved to France to escape American racial prejudice, wins the silver medal at the Universal Exposition in Paris for his painting Daniel in the Lions Den. He is one of Thomas Eakins’ all-time favorite students from their days at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

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365 Days of Art: October 18 – Canaletto is Born

October 18, 2014

October 18-Canaletto-Piazza San Marco w Basilica

October 18, 1697

Giovanni Canal, the Venician landscape painter better known as Canaletto, is born.

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365 Days of Art: October 17 – MoMA Hangs a Matisse Upside-Down!

October 17, 2014

Henri Matisse, Le Bateau (The Boat), Paper Cut, 1953

Henri Matisse, Le Bateau (The Boat), Paper Cut, 1953

October 17, 1961

The Museum of Modern Art hangs Henri Matisse’s Le Bateau upside-down–the mistake isn’t noticed or corrected for six weeks! Insert your modern or abstract art joke here…

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365 Days of Art: October 16 – Vincent Describes a Painting He Hasn’t Painted Yet

October 16, 2014

Vincent van Gogh, The Bedroom, 1888

Vincent van Gogh, The Bedroom, 1888

October 16, 1888

Vincent writes a descriptive letter to his brother:

My dear Theo,

At last I can send you a little sketch to give you at least an idea of the way the work is shaping up. For today I am all right again. My eyes are still tired but then I had a new idea in my head and here is the sketch of it. Another size 30 canvas. This time it’s just simply my bedroom, only here colour is to do everything, and giving by its simplification a grander style to things, is to be suggestive here of rest or of sleep in general. In a word, looking at the picture ought to rest the brain, or rather the imagination.

The walls are pale violet. The floor is of red tiles.

The wood of the bed and chairs is the yellow of fresh butter, the sheets and pillows very light greenish-citron.

The coverlet scarlet. The window green.

The toilet table orange, the basin blue.

The doors lilac.

And that is all – there is nothing in this room with its closed shutters.

The squareness of the furniture again must express inviolable rest. Portraits on the walls, and a mirror and a towel and some clothes.

The frame – as there is no white in the picture – will be white.

This by way of revenge for the enforced rest I was obliged to take.

I shall work on it again all day, but you see how simple the conception is. The shadows and the cast shadows are suppressed; it is painted in free flat tints like the Japanese prints. It is going to be a contrast to, for instance, the Tarascon diligence and the night café.

I am not writing you a long letter, because tomorrow very early I am going to begin in the cool morning light, so as to finish my canvas.

How are the pains – don’t forget to tell me about them.

I know that you will write one of these days.

I will make you sketches of the other rooms too someday.

With a good handshake.

Ever yours, Vincent

Vincent van Gogh, The Bedroom, 1888

Vincent van Gogh, The Bedroom, 1888

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