Posts Tagged ‘artists’

Ginevra

December 6, 2017

This fantastic, animated cut-paper film at Bellevue Arts Museum has very neatly intersected two trains of thought that have occupied my mind recently. One is the issue of domestic and other violence against women. #MeToo; Harvey Weinstein and all the others who were unmasked after him, not to mention before him. The other is, very […]

2017 | Blog | Tags: , , , , , Comments (0)

Cullercoats Women

December 6, 2017

My dad, who is fond of writing notes and memos, has recently sent two cards in a row from Winslow Homer’s Cullercoats series. We’re both fans of Homer, so maybe there’s nothing more to it. The theme is officially working women (fisherwomen and washerwomen of this British seaside town). But coupled with a recent public […]

2017 | Blog | Tags: , , , Comments (0)

More Moby Dick

November 14, 2017

On this day in 1851, Moby Dick was published. I admit to having a fascination/obsession with this book. I lived in New Bedford, Massachusetts, where Herman Melville once also lived. (He also lived in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where I was born). The parts of the novel that took place on land are set in New Bedford. […]

2017 | Blog | Tags: , , Comments (0)

The Answer is Blowin’ in the Wind

November 7, 2017

I think this one is my favorite of all from my latest trip to the Met. What is it about sheets in the wind? I remember playing underneath the clothesline, or among the rows, as a kid – nothing better. And laying on the bed while my mom made it up on top of me…I […]

2017 | Blog | Tags: , , , Comments (0)

Invisible Cities by Terri Saulin-Frock

October 28, 2017

I love going into what I call “real places” and seeing “real art”. For example, there’s an editioned print (not a poster) in the bathroom at the mall, or a quality painting hanging permanently at a bar. I was in the Philadelphia International Airport recently, and even though rotating art exhibitions are becoming more popular […]

2017 | Blog | Tags: , , , , Comments (0)

Dore Ashton, In Memoriam

February 5, 2017

I always loved reading Dore Ashton’s writing. It’s clear, but elegant and beautiful. Her friendships with artists put her in the unique position of being able to reveal anecdotes that cast their work in a new, more personal light. In her hands, they were significant yet little-known accounts that further enlightened the artists’ work; they […]

2017 | Blog | Tags: , , Comments (0)

Pride Project #4 – Il Sodoma

June 4, 2016

Il Sodoma was an Italian Renaissance painter who lived around 1500, and worked with Raphael and Pope Julius. He worked on both the Sistine Chapel and the Stanza della Segnatura in the Vatican (more commonly known as the Raphael Room). Unfortunately, he was fired from both of those projects, as were many other popular and […]

2016 | Blog | Tags: , , , Comments (0)

With This Printing Press, I Thee Wed

March 30, 2016

To say Dr. Elspeth Pope was a lover of letterpress would be an understatement. She was a book artist, a maker of printed cards, and a printer of broadsides, and used letterpress freely in all of these media. She named all of her dogs and cats after typefaces. When her future husband proposed to her, […]

2016 | Blog | Tags: , , , Comments (0)

If Renoir Can Do It…

January 16, 2016

I watch this video of Renoir, painting with his curled-up arthritic hands. Then I think how dedicated he must have been to go at it, near the end of his life, with those painful claws. Then I wonder why I have a hard time getting in the studio, when I’m as healthy as they come.

2016 | Blog | Tags: , Comments (0)

Road Trip: Van Gogh’s Arles, Part 2

October 29, 2015

Arles has managed to keep the look and feel captured by Vincent van Gogh in 1888. Here is the hospital where he stayed after he cut off his ear. It’s been converted into an art center called Espace Van Gogh, with small souvenir shops (mostly related to art) on the ground level. The garden is […]

2015 | Blog | Tags: , , , Comments (0)

Road Trip: Van Gogh’s Arles

October 27, 2015

One of the most stunning places I’ve been to is Arles, in the south of France, specifically retracing some of Van Gogh’s steps. This is where Vincent van Gogh spent about a year – probably the most eventful year of his life. Arles is where he created many of his masterpieces (the painting of his […]

2015 | Blog | Tags: , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: December 31 – Brunelleschi Wins Competition to Top Duomo with Lantern

December 31, 2014

December 31, 1436 Wardens for the Santa Maria Fiore cathedral meet in Florence to award the winner of a competition to top the Duomo with a lantern. There are five entries, and Brunelleschi wins. This is a like an Oscar-winner having to audition for a bit part, though: Brunelleschi has already built the duomo, inventing […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: December 30 – Mob Destroys Michelangelo’s Statue

December 30, 2014

December 30, 1511 Michelangelo’s statue of his frenemy Pope Julius II, who is patron of the Sistine Chapel and other projects, is destroyed by a mob. The tie a rope around its neck and pull the 10,000 pound statue from its pedestal. It smashes into pieces, but not before it leaves a crater in the […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: December 28 – Leonardo Sketches Hanged Corpse

December 28, 2014

December 28, 1479 Leonardo sketches the hanging of corpse of Bernardo di Bandino Baroncelli, who is executed for last year’s murder of Giuliano de Medici. That murder is organized by the Pazzi family, in a power grab, as they hope to replace the incredibly influential Medici family as political and civic leaders. A gang of […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: December 27 – NYC Mayor Doesn’t Understand Gorky’s Work

December 27, 2014

December 27, 1935 At the opening for a group exhibition that features one of Gorky’s sketches, for his airport mural, New York City Mayor Fiorella La Guardia meets Gorky, views his work, and tells a reporter: I am conservative in my art, as I am a progressive in my politics. That’s why I perhaps cannot […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , , Comments (0)