Posts Tagged ‘other 2D’

Public Art – 2nd Avenue Subway

October 21, 2017

I finally got to see the new 2nd Avenue subway! I’ve been waiting for this almost as long as Peggy Olson has! This would be my subway station, if I still lived in New York. It smells new, which is the oddest thing I’ve ever said or thought about the subway. New concrete. It’s airy […]

2017 | Blog | Tags: , , Comments (1)

Pride Project #14 – Tee Corrine

June 15, 2016

Tee Corrine’s photographs depicted lesbian sexuality. She deliberately and respectfully portrayed women of all body types and sizes, disabilities, ages, and ethnicities. Perhaps her best-known work is the Cunt Coloring Book. It wasn’t uncommon for printers to refuse to work with her due to this subject matter. Once, after a photograph was rejected with a […]

2016 | Blog | Tags: , , Comments (1)

365 Days of Art: November 11 – Calder Dies, Vietnam Vet Shoots Avedon Photo

November 14, 2014

November 11, 1976 Alexander Calder dies. November 11, 1986 Ellis Nelson enters the Black Forest Inn in Minneapolis, pulls a gun from his coat, and shoots two holes in an original Richard Avedon photograph hanging on the wall. The bullets strike two the subjects of the photo, women attending a Daughters of the American Revolution […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: September 12 – Dog and Teens Discover Lascaux Cave Paintings; Nan Goldin is Born

October 6, 2014

September 12, 1940 A group of French teenagers chase their dog down a hole and accidentally discover the most awesome cave paintings of all time at Lascaux. The prehistoric paintings are at least 15,000 years old, cover the walls and ceiling, and mainly depict animals. The degree of delicacy in these 600+ paintings is stunning. […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: August 20 – Richard Avedon Photographs Andy Warhol’s Gunshot Wounds

August 20, 2014

August 20, 1969 Fourteen months after the assassination attempt that almost took his life, Richard Avedon photographs Andy Warhol’s wounds.

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: August 7 – Stephen Berens Takes a Photo

August 7, 2014

August 7, 2005 Stephen Berens takes a photo from his window in Rome, which he later combines with nine other images of the exact same landscape view. The resulting photo (above), with its ten exposures, is exhibited in the 2014 Whitney Biennial and showcases Berens’ interest in process, layering, and the potential for inspiration in […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: July 26 – Three Events About Women in the Art World: a Suicide, a Congressional Debate, and a Job Interview

July 26, 2014

Three events today, about women in the art world: July 26, 1971 Diane Arbus commits suicide. She is a photographer, known for her black-and-white, usually head-on photos of folks that might make other folks cringe: a man in rollers and make-up, presumably half-way through his transformation to drag queen (this photo is spat on by […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , , , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: June 16 – NY Herald Reviews Edward Curtis’ Native American Project

June 16, 2014

June 16, 1907 The New York Herald says of Edward Curtis’ attempt to document all Native American tribes: The most gigantic undertaking since the making of the King James edition of the Bible”.

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: June 5 – Felix Partz Dies of AIDS; Is Memorialized in Photo

June 5, 2014

June 5, 1994 Artist Felix Partz dies of AIDS, and his collaborator AA Bronson documents the event in a heartbreakingly grotesque photograph. This is a real photo–even if it looks staged, or like a drawing based on a photograph–that shines light on AIDS, if only because it’s so hard to wrap your head around. Bronson […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: April 2 – Leonardo Da Vinci Sketches Skulls

April 2, 2014

April 2, 1489 Leonardo da Vinci sketches anatomical drawings of skulls in his notebook.

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: March 4 – Halftone Engraving Used to Print Photographs in Newspaper

March 4, 2014

March 4, 1880 Halftone engraving, used to print photographic images in shades of gray, was used for the first time when the Daily Graphic was published in New York City. An editorial ran at the same time, stating: “This process has not yet been fully developed. We are still experimenting with it. We feel confident […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: January 30 – Special Five-Day Photo Exhibition Closes to Keep Works from Fading

January 30, 2014

January 30, 2011 A special five-day exhibition of never-before-exhibited autochrome photographs, using low-oxygen enclosures to keep them from fading, closes at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Some background: what are autochromes? They’re photos made from a process that was developed in the early 20th century, transparent color images on glass that must be viewed either […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: January 24 – J. Pierpont Morgan Agrees to Fund Photographic Documentation of All Native American Tribes

January 24, 2014

January 24, 1906 At his office on Wall Street in New York, multi-millionaire and book collector J. Pierpont Morgan met with Seattle photographer Edward Curtis to discuss funding for Curtis’ pet project: a visual and textual documentation of all Native American tribes. Curtis had been distressed for some time over the forced assimilation of Native […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art: January 19 – Cindy Sherman Born

January 19, 2014

January 19, 1954 Cindy Sherman, American artist, was born. She is known for playing multiple roles in the creation of her photos, such as serving as her own make-up artist, hairdresser, and model, as well as photographer. Additionally, although her portraits are of herself, they aren’t truly self-portraits, since she takes on another persona. For […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , , , Comments (0)

365 Days of Art – January 9: Daguerreotype Photographic Process Announced

January 9, 2014

January 9, 1839 The French Academy of Science announces a new photographic discovery, called the Daguerrotype (pronounced “da-GARE-o-type) photo process. It was discovered in 1835 by Louis Daguerre. The plate was created by lining a thin copper plate with silver, then exposing it to iodine fumes. The plate was now photosensitive and ready to receive […]

2014 | Blog | Tags: , Comments (0)