abstract art

Quiet, poignant abstract painting by Gorky.

365 Days of Art: March 1 – Plane Crashes; Arshile Gorky Artwork Destroyed

March 1, 1962 American Airlines Flight 1 crashes in Jamaica Bay, Queens about two minutes after takeoff. Ninety five people and fifteen abstract works by Arshile Gorky are aboard, all en route to Los Angeles. All crew and passengers are killed. The artwork, on its way to an exhibition is LA, is destroyed. This is

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The peaked roofs of a white house shine in the sun as two women sit on the deck.

365 Days of Art: February 16 – Edward Hopper Poses for Raphael Soyer, Disses Abstract Art

February 16, 1963 Edward Hopper poses for the second time for Raphael Soyer, who is painting his portrait. Soyer noted the occasion, as well as their conversation in his diary: A professor, head of an art department, recently asked him to participate in an art symposium with the nonrepresentationalist Motherwell and others. “I said nix.

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Two disembodies legs vulnerably meet at the knees, amid background of dripping and/or geometric shapes.

A Big Week

In one week recently, four of my paintings found lovely new homes. My portrait of Abe Lincoln (read more about its backstory here) now hangs above the desk of a businesswoman from Brooklyn. In Secret went to a home in Manhattan and, in a neat turn of events, surprised a visitor who had seen it

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The Puzzle Pieces Were a Hit!

If you read my earlier post which explained the story behind the puzzle pieces, you know that I considered this an experimental piece…after all, I don’t usually make interactive pieces or installations. The idea was to create something visually interesting (as always), something that would advance the cause of drawing attention to–and stopping–gay bullying, and

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Maura McGurk’s First Solo Show: Pride and Prejudice, An Exhibition on Gay Bullying

Maura McGurk’s first solo exhibition will feature paintings created in response to gay bullying. McGurk began this body of work in fall of 2010, on the heels of several suicides by teenaged boys who had been bullied by classmates. These suicides were well-publicized due to their sheer number and proximity in time: five suicides in

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The Only Art Worth Doing Is the Art That Makes Things Better: An Interview with Maura McGurk

In an interview with fellow artist Gina Marie Dunn, Maura McGurk discusses her creative process and inspirations for creating political art. She also considers some practical issues about being a fine artist, and, true to form, even finds a way to reference the Red Sox/Yankees rivalry.

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